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01:35 

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Brideshead
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@темы: waugh

00:39 

Drinking, by Evelyn Waugh

Brideshead
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Extract ‘Drinking’ from The Essays, Articles and Reviews of Evelyn Waugh (1984)


In my childhood wine was a rare treat; an adult privilege to which I was admitted on special occasions. At my school there was no tabu against drinking (as there was against tobacco). Housemasters occasionally made a mild grog or cup for senior boys. I remember being embarrassed when one Ascension Day (a whole holiday) my companion got very drunk on liqueurs at a neighbouring hotel. It was at the university that I took to drink, discovering in a crude way the contrasting pleasures of intoxication and discrimination. Of the two, I preferred the former.

I think that my generation at Oxford, 1921-1924, was the last to preserve more or less intact the social habits of the nineteenth century. The ex-service men of the First War had gone down. Undergraduate motor-cars were very few. Women were not seen except in Eights Week. Oxford was still essentially a market-town surrounded by fields. It was rare for a man to go down for a night during term. The generation after ours cherished closer links with London. Girls drove up; men drove down. Cocktail shakers rattled, gramophones discoursed jazz. The Cowley works enveloped the city. But in my day our lives were bounded by the university. For a brief Indian summer we led lives very much like our fathers’.

In the matter of drink, beer was the staple. I speak of undergraduates of average means. There were a few rich men who drank great quantities of champagne and whisky; a few poor men who were reputed to drink cocoa. The average man, of whom I was one, spent $100 a term and went down $300 in debt. Luncheon was served in our room with jugs of beer. Beer was always drunk in Hall. At my college there was the custom of ‘sconcing’ when a breach of decorum, such as mentioning a woman’s name or quoting from a foreign tongue, was fined for the provision of beer for the table. At one time I used to drink a tankard of beer for breakfast, but I was alone in that. It was drawn and served without demur. The Dean of my college drank very heavily and was often to be seen feeling his way round the quad in his transit from Common Room to his rooms. There were occasions such as bump-suppers and ‘smokers’ when whole colleges were given up in bacchanalia. In my first year there was a ‘freshers’ blind’ when we all go drunk on wines and spirits and most of us were sick. Some white colonials got obstreperous and the custom was given up. All drinks were procurable at the buttery but the bursar scrutinised our weekly battels and was liable to remonstrate with a man whose consumption seemed excessive. My friends and I had accounts with wine merchants in the town, relying on the buttery for beer and excellent mild claret, which was the normal beverage at club meetings held in undergraduate rooms. No one whom I knew ever had a bottle of gin in his rooms. I remember only one man being sent down from my college for drunkenness and that not his own; late at night he hospitably passed tumblers of whisky out of his ground-floor window to a friend in the lane, who was picked up insensible by the police. I always thought it a harsh sentence. The poor fellow had come three thousand miles from the United States to imbibe European culture.


There were six or seven clubs with their own premises; some, like the Grid, highly respectable; others, Hogarthian drinking dens. The most notable of the dens was named the Hypocrites, in picturesque Tudor rooms over a bicycle shop in St Aldates (now of course demolished). There the most popular drink was red Burgundy drunk from earthenware tankards. A standing house rule was: ‘Gentlemen may prance but not dance.’ The oddest of these clubs with premises was the New Reform at the corner of the Cornmarket on Ship Street. This was subsidised by Lloyd George in the belief that it would be a nursery for earnest young Liberals. It became a happy centre of anarchy and debauch. Habits of extravagance grew and in my last year we drank a good deal of champagne in mid-morning at the New Reform and scoffed from the windows at the gowned figures hurrying from lecture to lecture. There was a vogue for whisky and crumpets at tea-time in the Union. I think it is no exaggeration to say that, in my last year, I and most of my friends were drunk three or four times a week, quite gravely drunk, sometimes requiring to be undressed and put to bed, but more often clowning exuberantly and, it seemed to us, very funnily. We were never pugnacious or seriously destructive. It took very little to inebriate at that age and high spirits made us behave more flamboyantly than our state of intoxication really warranted. Not many of us have become drunkards.

We were not discriminating. In a novel I once gave a description of two undergraduates sampling a cellar of claret. I never had that experience at that age. Indeed I do not think that at twenty I could distinguish with any certainty between claret and burgundy. Port was another matter. The tradition of port drinking lingered. Many of the colleges had ample bins of fine vintages of which undergraduates were allowed a strictly limited share. Port we drank with reverence and learned to appreciate. The 1904s were then at their prime, or, at any rate, in excellent condition. We were not ashamed (nor am I now) to relish sweet wine. Yquem had, of course, a unique reputation. Starting to drink it in a mood of ostentation, I was led to the other white Bordeaux. Tokay was then procurable and much relished. Bristol Milk and a dark sherry named Brown Bang were also favourites. We tried anything we could lay our hands on, but table-wines were the least of our interests. We drank them conventionally at luncheon and dinner parties but waited eagerly for the heavier and headier concomitants of dessert.

Nowadays, I am told, men privately drink milk and, when they entertain, do so to entice girls. It is tedious for the young to be constantly reminded what much finer fellows their fathers were and what a much more enjoyable time we had. But there you are; we were and we did.




@темы: grave sins, waugh

23:44 

Feliks Topolski (1907-1989) Evelyn Waugh signed, inscribed and...

Brideshead
contra mundum


Feliks Topolski (1907-1989)
Evelyn Waugh
signed, inscribed and dated ‘EVELYN WAUGH/Feliks Topolski 60’ (lower left)
charcoal, on paper
19


@темы: waugh

22:49 

Photo

Brideshead
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@темы: waugh

21:56 

There’s something about the Catholic novel that takes...

Brideshead
contra mundum



There’s something about the Catholic novel that takes seriously the dialectic between an ancient tradition and a modern era that dismisses it. (Protestants, on the other hand, like to pretend their tradition transcends modernity, while in point of fact it is often suckled by it.) Waugh felt this tension acutely: As Shulevitz says, he “craved some stable and all-encompassing order but couldn’t stop spotting the flaws in whatever system he encountered.” No wonder he was so grumpy.





@темы: waugh

16:54 

"Beware of seriousness: it is a form of stupidity."

Brideshead
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“Beware of seriousness: it is a form of stupidity.”

-

Alexander Waugh


Aw_pgph_bwkk




@темы: waugh

07:00 

With Edmund Blunden in1963.

Brideshead
contra mundum


With Edmund Blunden in1963.




@темы: waugh

06:09 

So, this is Evelyn Waugh on the left. Can you recognize other...

Brideshead
contra mundum


So, this is Evelyn Waugh on the left. Can you recognize other people in the picture?




@темы: waugh

05:13 

Photo

Brideshead
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@темы: waugh

04:20 

The Spiritually Mediocre and the Wisdom of the Church

Brideshead
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September 10, 2008 by frmarkdwhite



Evelyn Waugh
Studying the old Mass reminded me of something that the novelist Evelyn Waugh wrote around 1970. When the Mass was changed, he wrote some letters to the Cardinal Archbishop of London lamenting the novelities.

Waugh objected to the intense insistence on “building community spirit” in the 1970


@темы: waugh, religion

03:22 

WilliamRanken.org

Brideshead
contra mundum
02:29 

Paintings by William Ranken

Brideshead
contra mundum










Paintings by William Ranken




@темы: they are not they

01:35 

William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1881-1941) Scottish born portrait...

Brideshead
contra mundum


William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1881-1941) Scottish born portrait painter




@темы: they are not they

00:41 

William Bruce Ellis Ranken (1881-1941)

Brideshead
contra mundum

The supposedly gay painter who was much helped by Lord Beauchamp and who painted the famour Lygon portraits.



From: Wendy & Gordon Hawksley


“William Bruce Ellis Ranken was born in Edinburgh in 1881, the second son of Robert Burt Ranken, a prosperous lawyer, and his wife Mary. He was educated at Eton and The Slade School of Art under Henry Tonks. He had his first one man exhibition at the Carfax Gallery, London in 1904, a gallery much favoured by Sargent at that time. Moving in the circles of Edwardian aesthetes, it is known that he was well acquainted with Sargent by 1908 and Wilfrid Gabriel de Glehn. By 1914 he was living at 14 Cheltenham Terrace, Chelsea, a couple of minutes walk away from Sargent’s studio in Tite Street. Unable to serve in the First World War due the effects of childhood polio, he subsequently went to America on a commission through Sargent. He had his first one man exhibition there in January 1916 at the Doll & Richards Gallery, Boston. Sargent introduced him to Isabella Stewart Gardner who acquired his watercolour ‘In a Turkish Garden’. Later that same year he had a one man exhibition at the Galleries of M Knoedler & Co in New York and by this time had had commissions by other prominent Americans such as the Vanderbilts, Whitneys and Havemeyers, probably due to introductions effected by Sargent.

A prolific artist, he worked equally in oil and watercolour and his work included portraits, interiors, landscapes and still life. His subjects included members of the British Royal Family and aristocracy. Throughout his life he travelled widely, with France being a particularly favourite destination. He exhibited at virtually all the major Galleries and Societies in Great Britain and became a Member of The National Portrait Society, The Royal Institute of Oil Painters, The Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours, The Royal Society Portrait Painters and The Pastel Society. By 1921, thanks to his success in America, he had acquired Warbrook House at Eversley in Hampshire, a substantial 18th century property and estate. He appears to have returned to America in the mid 1920’s and had a one man exhibition of interiors at Wildenstein & Co., Inc. in New York in January 1931 and an exhibition of portraits at Knoedler & Co, New York in late 1933. Affected by the Depression, he returned to England, was forced to sell his beloved Warbrook and moved to the south wing of the nearby Farley Hill Place, another prominent English country house, the home of one of his sisters who had married into the family of the Earls of Elgin and Kincardine.

Like Sargent, Ranken was unmarried. He died suddenly in London in 1941 and was buried in the churchyard at Eversley. In January 1943 his American patrons and friends, who had included people such as Mrs. Lars Anderson, Mrs. Otto Kahn, Mrs. Dave Hennen Morris, Miss Anne Morgan, Elsie de Wolfe and Mrs Ector Munn, organised a retrospective exhibition of his work at the Ferargil Galleries in New York. The contents of his studios in New York and London, about 100 works, were not dispersed until 1946 when, according to his wishes, they were distributed to provincial art galleries in Great Britain by his sister, Janette who had married Ranken’s lifelong friend, the actor Ernest Thesiger who had had his portrait drawn by Sargent in about 1911. Despite a very active life in society and artistic circles, Ranken’s name is scarcely known today and this is possibly reflected in the very sad fact that only one of his paintings is on public display in Great Britain, his ‘Olga Alberta, Baroness de Meyer’ (painted in Venice in 1907) at Leeds City Art Gallery.”




@темы: they are not they

23:44 

willy-i-am: It’s fun to take pictures of people taking...

Brideshead
contra mundum


willy-i-am:



It’s fun to take pictures of people taking pictures.





@темы: oxford

22:50 

l0lk: omg this is some random unicorn at Oxford… it’s got two...

Brideshead
contra mundum


l0lk:



omg this is some random unicorn at Oxford… it’s got two horns or s/t





@темы: oxford

21:56 

Beware of the Anglo-Catholics - they’re all sodomites with unpleasant accents. The...

Brideshead
contra mundum

Beware of the Anglo-Catholics - they’re all sodomites with unpleasant accents.



The Lygons were Anglo-Catholics starting from the 6th earl Beauchamp, Jane Mulvagh informs us in Madresfield. And there was a homosexual in each generation starting from that time too.




@темы: Religion, fairies, they are not they

10:10 

Reblog if you want your followers to ask you anything they're curious about

Brideshead
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I don’t think there’s much you’d like to know about Edward and me (but then, why not!) - but I am willing to answer questions (and do research) about Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited and the Lygons, so ask away :-)




06:15 

"[Terrence] Greenidge claims that Sebastian Flyte is “in the main Hugh Lygon”, though..."

Brideshead
contra mundum
“[Terrence] Greenidge claims that Sebastian Flyte is “in the main Hugh Lygon”, though almost everyone else has seen the character as a version of Alastair Graham.”

-

Evelyn Waugh newsletter, Vol. 28-32




@темы: i am not i, sebastian

05:28 

nikitajade: Bridge of Sighs, Oxford, UK.

Brideshead
contra mundum


nikitajade:



Bridge of Sighs, Oxford, UK.





@темы: charles, oxford

Brideashead revisited

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