Ознакомьтесь с нашей политикой обработки персональных данных

URL
  • ↓
  • ↑
  • ⇑
 
17:45 

Доступ к записи ограничен

Brideshead
contra mundum
Закрытая запись, не предназначенная для публичного просмотра

URL
16:00 

A Note on British Titles of Rank With Special Reference to the Works of Evelyn Waugh, by Donald Greene

Brideshead
contra mundum
A Note on British Titles of Rank With Special Reference to the Works of Evelyn Waugh, by Donald Greene:

All peerages are created by the sovereign (nowadays on advice of the prime minister). There are five grades of peers: in descending order of rank, duke, marquess (the spelling now preferred to the French “marquis”), earl, viscount, baron. Historically, there are five different peerages: those of England and of Scotland, creations before the union of those two kingdoms by the Act of Union of 1707, after which Englishmen and Scots raised to the peerage were peers of Great Britain; peers of Ireland, created before Ireland was united with Great Britain by the Act of Union of 1801. After that date, most new creations were peers of the United Kingdom, though a few creations of peers of Ireland still took place.
[…]


Most peerages descend by male primogeniture, but a few, mostly Scottish, together with ancient English baronies, may, in absence of a male heir, be inherited by a woman. These ladies are “peeresses in their own right.” By the Peerage Act, 1963, for the first time peeresses in their own right were permitted to sit and vote in the House of Lords, the upper house of Parliament.


[…]


Peers of England, Scotland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, not being minors, were entitled to membership in the House of Lords.


[…]


A peer’s wife (though referred to as a “peeress”) and children, unless they have acquired peerages in their own right, are legally commoners.


[…]


Courtesy titles. Nearly all dukes, marquesses, and earls hold other peerages of a lower grade, and their oldest surviving sons are “by courtesy” addressed by the title of the second-ranking peerage (which may not necessarily be the grade immediately below that of the head of the family). If there is more than one such subordinate peerage, the oldest son of the oldest son is addressed by the next senior title: thus the oldest son of the Duke of Devonshire is “by courtesy” Marquess of Hartington, and his oldest son is Earl of Burlington. The younger sons of dukes and marquesses are “Lord” with their given and family names. Nevertheless they remain commoners, and the actual peerage indicated by the courtesy title continues to be held by the head of the family. Many holders of courtesy titles have had successful careers in the House of Commons: for instance, the Marquess of Hartington, heir to the seventh Duke of Devonshire, who declined three offers of the prime ministry, normally held by a member of the House of Commons


[…]


Daughters of dukes, marquesses, and earls are “Lady” with their given and family names. If they marry a commoner, they substitute their husband’s family name for their own, but retain the “Lady Mary” or whatever it is. On marrying a peer, they take the normal designation of a peer’s wife.


[…]


Marquesses and marchionesses are “Most Honourable”; other peers and peeresses are “Right Honourable.” “Lord” and “Lady” may be used informally for peers of the rank of marquess and below (dukes and duchesses are never “Lord” or “Lady” So-and-so). Of course, among intimate friends, even these honorifics are dropped, and the Earl of Brideshead becomes merely “Brideshead” or “Bridey” (we are never told his first name), and Lady Julia Flyte “Julia.”


[…]


Peers, “courtesy” peers, and peeresses in their own right merely sign with their titles—e.g., “Marchmain,” “Brideshead.” Peeresses by marriage sign with their title preceded by their given name or initial—“Teresa Marchmain.” (She could never have been “Lady Teresa Marchmain.” Before her marriage, as the daughter of a high-ranking peerage family, she may have been “Lady Teresa Blank,” but on her marriage to the marquess she became “Lady Marchmain.”) “Courtesy” lords and ladies omit those titles from their signatures—“Sebastian Flyte,” “Celia Ryder”—as do ennobled actors and writers in playbills and on title pages of books


[…]


At the coronation of a sovereign, at the moment the crown is placed on his or her head, the peers and peeresses don their coronets. That of a duke is a gold circlet surmounted by stylized strawberry leaves; of marquesses by strawberry leaves alternating with balls; of earls, strawberry leaves alternating with balls raised on “points”; of viscounts, sixteen balls; of barons, eight balls. Waugh makes a slight slip when the villagers in Brideshead have to change the earl’s coronets on the bunting erected to celebrate Lord Brideshead’s marriage to a marquess’s, to celebrate Lord Marchmain’s homecoming, “obliterating the Earl’s points and stenciling balls and strawberry leaves” (Brideshead 2:5). The coronation robes of peers are scarlet, trimmed with, for dukes, four rows of ermine; for marquesses, three and a half; for earls, three; for viscounts and barons, two.


[…]


As well as the peers, the prefix “Lord” is attached to numerous official appointments. It is not a personal designation (except for Scottish judges): a Mr. Smith who is appointed, say, Lord Privy Seal remains Mr. Smith and does not become “Lord Smith.”


[…]


Titled Characters in Waugh


Marquesses. The best known, of course, is the Marquess of Marchmain in Brideshead Revisited, whose family provides a great deal of the novel’s plot. His oldest son and heir bears the courtesy title of Earl of Brideshead (we are never told his Christian name); after his father’s death he succeeds as Marquess. The other children, Lord Sebastian, Lady Julia, and Lady Cordelia, figure prominently in the novel. After her marriage to Mr. Rex Mottram, Lady Julia Flyte becomes Lady Julia Mottram, but after their divorce resumes her name of Lady Julia Flyte. Waugh apparently first planned to make the head of the family an earl, in which case the younger son would have been not “Lord” but “the Honourable” Sebastian Flyte, although Ladies Julia and Cordelia would retain those honorifics. Waugh may have been influenced by the Marquess of Steyne (stain?) in Thackeray’s Vanity Fair, whose family circumstances closely resemble those of Lord Marchmain’s: the Marquess a cynical, worldly, amoral man, estranged from his devoutly Catholic Marchioness, with two sons, the elder, the Earl of Gaunt, detesting and detested by his father, the younger, Lord George Gaunt, eventually becoming insane.
On his deathbed, Lord Marchmain reflects on the history of the peerages in his family. Speaking of the ancient family tombs, he remarks, “We were knights then, barons since [the battle of] Agincourt [1415]; the larger honours came with the [Protestant King] Georges. They came the last and they’ll go the first; the barony descends in the female line; when Brideshead is buried—he married late [1st edition; the 2nd substitutes, more accurately, “when all of you are dead”]—Julia’s son will be called by the name his fathers bore before the fat days” (Brideshead 2:5). An interesting point of peerage law: the Marquessate and Earldom, descending in the male line, will become extinct. If Julia and Cordelia survive the childless Brideshead, the ancient Barony will fall into abeyance between the two daughters; if Julia should survive Cordelia, she would become the Baroness Flyte (or whatever the title is) in her own right, and her son (by whom, one wonders) would inherit the Barony after her death.


Earls. Perhaps unexpectedly, a historical Earl has a tiny cameo role in Brideshead. Lord Marchmain, on his deathbed, having the daily newspaper read to him in 1939 and reminiscing, remarks “Irwin … I knew him—a mediocre fellow” (2:5). The reference is to Edward Wood (1881-1959), Earl of Halifax, foreign secretary in the Cabinet of Neville Chamberlain and a supporter of “appeasement,” Winston Churchill’s chief rival for the prime ministry in 1940, and later ambassador to the United States. Lord Marchmain contemptuously refers to him by his earlier title, Lord Irwin, conferred when he was appointed viceroy of India and through his actions created much controversy.


Viscounts. “Boy,” Viscount Mulcaster, and his sister Lady Celia, who marries Charles Ryder (their family name is not disclosed), are probably children of an earl (or conceivably duke or marquess). Mulcaster’s Viscountcy must be a courtesy title; if it were a substantive one and he were head of the family, his sister would not be “Lady Celia” but merely “the Honourable Celia.”




@темы: bridey, aristocracy

05:55 

"Sebastian Flyte describes his family as ‘social lepers’."

Brideshead
contra mundum
“Sebastian Flyte describes his family as ‘social lepers’.”

-

Mad World by Paula Byrne


Byrne is sometimes so annoyingly inaccurate when it comes to quoteng and interpreting Brideshead one could thing she really doesn’t know what she is investigating. This one quote is probably one of the best-known Brideshead quotes ever – the last part of it at least. How could one possibly get it wrong?



“He says he knows my father, which is impossible.”
“Why?”
“No one knows Papa. He’s a social leper. Hadn’t you heard?”
“It’s a pity neither of us can sing,” I said.





@темы: byrne, i spit on you

13:09 

‘Saved’ by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer …then you...

Brideshead
contra mundum


‘Saved’ by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer



…then you must allow Landseer his gleam of loyalty in the spaniel’s eye



But it’s not a spaniel, is it?




@темы: motifs

15:37 

Оксфорд

contra mundum
Колледж Себастьяна: Christ Church.
Колледж Чарльза: Hertford College (?).

@темы: charles, oxford, sebastian

21:28 

Is it Castle Howard, really?

Brideshead
contra mundum


Is it Castle Howard, really?




@темы: covers

10:05 

Дети рисуют по... косплеят святых

Brideshead
contra mundum

@темы: religion, cosplay

23:46 

Audiobook

Brideshead
contra mundum

Brideshead Revisited (unabridged) read by Jeremy Irons: torrent; mp3; 56kbps; Chivers Audio Books 2000.




@темы: books

23:05 

Себастьян Флайт / Рукоделие | skill.ru

Brideshead
contra mundum
16:15 

Castle Howard

Brideshead
contra mundum

With a few filters on





@темы: unhealthy pictures

13:34 

А это просто пост

contra mundum
для поиска идеального или хотя бы сносного каста.

@темы: films

16:13 

The real Sebastian?

Brideshead
contra mundum
15.12.2010 в 23:03
Пишет tes3m:

Опять Стивен Теннант



Фотографировал Сесил Битон. (Отсюда.)
+ 14 (рисунки Стивена и немного фотографий)

URL записи
much more

07.10.2010 в 05:04
Пишет tes3m:

Из книги Ф. Хора "Серьезные развлечения. Жизнь Стивена Теннанта"
       «К октябрю 1934 Стивен возвращается в Уилсфорд, правда, ненадолго. Им все еще владеет страсть к путешествиям, хоть и едет он на этот раз всего лишь в сельский Дорсет. Здесь Стивен во второй раз посещает Т.Э.Лоуренса, живущего в крохотном скромном коттедже Клаудс-хилл недалеко от военного лагеря Бовингтон, куда он был назначен служить. Ведущий отшельническую жизнь Лоуренс радовался, когда его навещали Э.М.Форстер и Зигфрид Сассун. Теннант был очарован загадочностью авантюриста и они прекрасно поладили, обсудив, среди прочих, Ноэля Коуарда. "Музыку он сочиняет неважную" — сказал герой Аравии. — Кроме энергии у него ничего нет". Лоуренс сказал Стивену, что теперь на него воодушевляюще действуют лишь простые радости — например, cобирать цветущий дрок и вереск, а потом сушить их у камина. Он сказал, что скоро покинет Военно-воздушные силы, где служил под именем капрала Т.Э. Шоу. "Обязательно приезжайте со мной повидаться, — сказал он. — Мне будет нужно, чтобы меня веселили и развлекали".
       Стивен отметил, что тот говорил по-военному короткими, рваными фразами — словно азбукой Морзе. Они разговаривали о друзьях — больше всего о Форстере, при этом Лоуренс сделал загадочное замечание: "Он — единственный, но люди этого не знают". Они говорили о последних произведениях Моргана; один рассказ — о любовной связи с призраком ("Доктор Вулэкотт") — Лоуренс особенно любил, он сказал Стивену, что хочет, чтобы Форстер его опубликовал. Этому суждено было получить печальное значение в глазах Стивена, потому что всего несколько месяцев спустя, в мае 1935, Лоуренс, ехавший на своем мотоцикле из Клаудс-Хилла, попал в аварию и погиб. »
Отрывок в оригинале и примечания.

Так выглядят дневники Стивена Теннанта.Отсюда
+2

URL записи
запись создана: 15.02.2011 в 13:38

@темы: sebastian

14:48 

mr waugh
Why does everyone except me find it so easy to be nice?
Возвращение в Мэдресфилд
Я – это не я;
ты – это не он и не она;
они – не они.
И.В.
«Возвращение в Брайдсхед»


Перечитанная книга и уже пересмотренный фильм не отпускают. «Я влюбился в семью», - написал Во и мне захотелось выяснить, что это была за семья.
Своей подруге леди Дороти Лигон он писал о книге так: «Она о семье, глава которой живет за границей, как Бум, но он – не Бум; и младший сын – люди скажут, что он похож на Хьюи, но ты увидишь, что он не совсем Хьюи; и их дом мог бы быть Мэдом, но не совсем Мэд»

Несмотря на эти слова и на примечание автора, вынесенного в эпиграф, общественное мнение о романе было таково: «Это семья Лигон». читать дальше До самой смерти в 2001 году Дороти занималась архивом мужа, публикацией его книг.
Не смотря на то, что она написала Во: «Себастьян заставил меня почувствовать угрызения совести», всю жизнь Дороти горячо отрицала вероятность того, что Возвращение в Брайдсхед» было историей Лигонов.

Поместье Мэдресфилд сейчас принадлежит леди Розалинд Моррисон. Ее отец, младший сын графа и графини Бичам Дики дал ей прочесть «Возвращение в Брайдсхед» когда она была подростком. Так же как и Оберон Во своему сыну, он подтвердил, что сходства с семейной историей, которые она обнаружила, - несомненно не случайны.

«Я пишу очень красивую, вызывающую слезы книгу об очень богатых, красивых, высокорожденных людях, живущих во дворцах и не имеющих проблем, кроме тех, что они создают себе сами…». Из письма к Дороти Лигон.



Цитаты из «Возвращения в Брайдсхед» даны в переводе Инны Бернштейн.

Отсюда

@темы: flytes, sebastian

19:25 

mr waugh
Why does everyone except me find it so easy to be nice?
10.06.2010 в 12:55
Пишет tes3m:

Флоренс Тамайн о "культе гомосексуальности" в Оксфорде между двумя мировыми войнами
Я объединила вместе 6 постов из своего дневника.

Флоренс Тамайн одну из глав в своей "Истории гомосексуальности в Европе. 1919-1939" назвала "Переоценка ценностей: культ гомосексуальности". В этой главе она рассматривает период между двумя мировыми войнами в Англии. Выражение "культ гомосексуальности" она взяла из книги разведчика, ученого и писателя Ноэля Аннана (1916-2000) "Наш век. Портрет поколения" (Our Age: Portrait of a Generation. 1990)

Один из разделов этой главы целиком посвящен Оксфорду. Начинается он с известного высказывания поэта Джона Бетжемена (1906-1984): "В то время все в Оксфорде были гомосексуальны". Тамайн считает, что это "вне всякого сомнения преувеличение, но Оксфорд (в гораздо большей степени, чем Кембридж) безусловно прошел через период сильной гомофилии между двумя мировыми войнами.читать дальше

URL записи

11.06.2009 в 18:17
Пишет Tryphena:

URL записи

@темы: Oxford, motifs

23:04 

Это пост ненависти

mr waugh
Why does everyone except me find it so easy to be nice?
Он посвящён бессмертному переводу и Инне Максимовне Бернштейн лично.

@темы: books

23:24 

Военная форма

mr waugh
Why does everyone except me find it so easy to be nice?
12:14 

Lyonnesse

Fili, suscipe senectam patris tui et non contristes eum in vita illius; et, si defecerit sensu, veniam da et ne spernas eum omnibus diebus vitae eius. (Ecc 3:14-15)

@темы: Oxford, geography

14:51 

Лондон

contra mundum
Карта Лондона 1923 года с отмеченными локациями.
Будет обновляться, если мы найдём ещё.

(2526 x 2015 пик., 7929 Кб)

Исходник, чтобы править

@темы: geography

17:00 

DeviantArt

mr waugh
Why does everyone except me find it so easy to be nice?
12:01 

Св. Себастьян

contra mundum
[В комментариях]

@темы: sebastian

Brideashead revisited

главная