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Записи пользователя: Brideshead (список заголовков)
04:42 

From Evelyn Waugh: a literary biography, Vol. 2, by John Howard Wilson

Brideshead
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During Easter vacation Waugh and Matthew (later Baron) Pon-sonby decided “to pub-crawl to Golders Green.” On their way back, Pon-sonby drove in the wrong direction on Oxford Street, and they were arrested. Matthew’s father was Arthur (later Baron) Ponsonby, former Sec­retary of State for Foreign Affairs. Arthur had Matthew released but re­fused to help Evelyn, who spent four hours in an “awful little cell.” Charged with being drunk and incapable, Waugh was fined fifteen shillings and sixpence (DEW 202, 205-206). Though he faced prison, Ponsonby escaped with loss of his license and a fine of


@темы: i am not i, lord marchmain, sebastian, they are not they, waugh

03:57 

abigailborg: Oxford, 4th May.

Brideshead
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@темы: oxford

03:11 

"At Goodhart’s, I eventually settled down to mess with Denys Buckley and Hugh Lygon. Lygon,..."

Brideshead
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“At Goodhart’s, I eventually settled down to mess with Denys Buckley and Hugh Lygon. Lygon, fairhaired, nice mannered, a Giotto angel living in a narcissistic dream, was a year older than Buckley and me. He left after a couple of halves to travel abroad before Oxford; his place at tea taken (perhaps not immediately) by Hubert Duggan, also a year or more older; by then Captain of the House. That combination - Duggan, Buckley, myself - is my most remembered Eton life, out of school hours, or the Studio. Once, when the three of us were walking down town, a small boy in jackets, afterwards identified as named Lay-cock (later Major-General Sir Robert, who arranged for Evelyn Waugh to be transferred from the Royal Marines to the Royal Horse Guards), muttered ‘Goodhart’s bloody trio.’ Duggan was delighted. ‘Excellent’ he said. ‘Excellent. That’s what we are. Goodhart’s bloody trio’.

Hubert Duggan’s demeanour at school — though not in later life — contributes something to Stringham in my novel. On the other hand, Buckley bears no resemblance whatever to Templer, represented as the Narrator’s other companion at tea. Templer (if such things must be established) is - again only at school - a trifle like John Spencer, a friend at another house, one of the several temperamentally unmilitary figures known to me who died in action.”

- From To keep the ball rolling: the memoirs of Anthony Powell


@темы: i am not i, lord marchmain, sebastian

02:26 

the Chancellor of the University of London, Lord Beauchamp, on...

Brideshead
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the Chancellor of the University of London, Lord Beauchamp, on Presentation Day, May 1930




@темы: i am not i, lord marchmain

01:40 

"Evelyn’s friends - Peter Quennell, Terence Greenidge, Somerset Maugham and many more - saw..."

Brideshead
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“Evelyn’s friends - Peter Quennell, Terence Greenidge, Somerset Maugham and many more - saw Hugh Lygon as the model for Sebastian Flyte.”

- Mad World by Paula Byrne


@темы: i am not i, sebastian

06:14 

talkmorenonsense: Oxford, loved that evening!

Brideshead
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talkmorenonsense:



Oxford, loved that evening!





@темы: grave sins, oxford

05:28 

Photo

Brideshead
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@темы: oxford

04:42 

originalposeur: Tree, Fez

Brideshead
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@темы: morocco

03:56 

gardiendelamemoire: Museum of Oxford

Brideshead
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@темы: oxford

03:11 

allaboutmorocco: Fes, Morocco. By ~AJLloyd (deviantArt).

Brideshead
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allaboutmorocco:



Fes, Morocco. By ~AJLloyd (deviantArt).





@темы: morocco

02:25 

Modern Living: Bear Market

Brideshead
contra mundum

Friday, Dec. 05, 1969


Actress Samantha Eggar took hers to her wedding—he sat in the front pew on the “bride’s side.” Lady Beatty’s got bundled off on the honeymoon as well. Actor Paul Scofield confesses to having stolen one. The King of Thailand has taken his along on state visits. All are participants in what British Actor Peter Bull describes as “the vast underground Teddy-bear movement which exists in the adult world.”


Teddy bears kid stuff? Not so, says Peter Bull in his book, Bear with Me, published in England. Give a Teddy to an impressionable child, and the bear has a place in the child’s effects and affections for life. Bull, a character actor whose own family of Teddies numbers 14, presents ample and arresting testimony to the fact that he is no oddity but merely one of thousands of thoroughly grown-up people, all dedicated “arctophilists”—friends of the bear.


Frightfully Interesting. Poet John Betjeman, for example, paid tribute to his stuffed, 60-year-old ursine friend “Archibald Ormsby-Gore” in his work Summoned by Bells (“Safe were those evenings of the pre-war world/When I turned to Archibald, my safe old bear”). The late Donald Campbell set new speed records with his “Mr. Woppit” along for the ride, and Mountain Climber Walter Bonnati got through one low point on his solitary trek up the Matterhorn’s north slopes by confessing his “sins” to Zissi, a tiny Teddy in his knapsack. Princess Alexandra of Kent became almost inconsolable when her Teddy got lost on a good-will tour of the Far East. “Most Teddy bears,” he concludes, “seem to lead frightfully interesting lives.”


To obtain such hitherto top-secret information, Bull ran a front-page ad in the London Times requesting “History of E. Bear Esquire. Reminiscences, Data, Photographs.” He also issued public pleas for facts and figures on arctophilia during television appearances with “Theodore,” oldest of his own Teddies (all of whom, he complains, get into “a foul temper” when he is away from them). Letters poured in from both American and British bear lovers, as well as from several bears (“They are just as articulate as Other Persons”). Bull soon discovered that of the 250 Teddy bears lost on transport vehicles in London each year, almost all are claimed; that exactly 50% of British children surveyed and 55% of American ones consider Teddy their favorite toy; and that 45% of a sampling of British children call their critter “Teddy” because, as many of them pointed out, “he is a Teddy.” However, 40% of American slum children who were shown a picture of the toy thought that the animal was a rat.


Triumphant Symbol. Teddy bears are precisely 67 years old. The name was attached to a new line of stuffed bruins manufactured by the forerunner of the Ideal Toy Corp. and by Germany’s Steiff Co. after President Theodore Roosevelt, on an expedition to Mississippi in 1902, refused to shoot a bear cub. Washington Star Cartoonist Clifford Berryman instantly made the cub a symbol for Roosevelt, and the country went for the notion lock, stock, and bear jokes. (If T.R. is President when he is fully dressed, went one knee-slapper, what is he with his clothes off? Answer: Teddy bare.)


As for Teddy’s future, Bull looks to the past, his tone Churchillian. “They have gone into battle on guns, tanks and in haversacks. They have saved lives by intercepting bullets, breaking falls, and just being around. They’ve flown round the world, been drowned in floods, burned in concentration camps and worshiped as totems. There are no cases of disloyal, treacherous or cowardly Teddy bears. They seem destined to survive everything and emerge as a triumphant symbol of something or other.”


@темы: aloysius

01:37 

 The book tells the story of a bear called Archibald...

Brideshead
contra mundum



The book tells the story of a bear called Archibald Ormsby-Gore and the struggles he must go through in rural Southern England in order to follow his faith. You could argue, in these multicultural times, that it is a sobering parable.



For pictures, follow the source link.




@темы: aloysius, i am not i

00:51 

myhaecceity: Bear (by floridapfe) Sorry, couldn’t...

Brideshead
contra mundum


myhaecceity:



Bear (by floridapfe)



Sorry, couldn’t resist.




@темы: I like getting drunk at luncheons, aloysius

00:06 

spleen0000: Oxford on Flickr.

Brideshead
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@темы: oxford

23:19 

radicaltraditionalism: Bodleian Library. Opened in 1602 the...

Brideshead
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radicaltraditionalism:



Bodleian Library. Opened in 1602 the library is the oldest public library in Europe. The Bodleian although justly the most famous library was not the first library in Oxford. The library is of course named after Thomas Bodley (1545-1613) See Sir Nicholas’ Stone’s well known monument to him in Merton College Chapel. The Library may have been the work of John Akroyd of Halifax and John Bentley. In the big panel is depicted James 1st seated under a niche. The whole appearance of the face on the inner courtyard is magnificent and bears close study.



Merton college.




@темы: oxford

22:34 

Photo

Brideshead
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@темы: oxford

21:47 

skydog91: Oxford Arms, 1875

Brideshead
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skydog91:



Oxford Arms, 1875





@темы: oxford

15:16 

dreamyfarofflook: fyeahenglishmajorarmadillo: [Picture:...

Brideshead
contra mundum


dreamyfarofflook:



fyeahenglishmajorarmadillo:



[Picture: Background — a six piece pie style colour split, alternating black and grey. Foreground — a picture of an armadillo. Top text: “ [Tell someone you are reading an Evelyn Waugh novel] ” Bottom text: “ [‘Oh, I love her!’ Just go home.] ”]



I just finished Brideshead! I dread this happening.





@темы: I like getting drunk at luncheons, submission, waugh

06:14 

the4ge: Hogwarts! (Christ Church dining hall, Oxford England)

Brideshead
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the4ge:



Hogwarts! (Christ Church dining hall, Oxford England)





@темы: oxford

05:28 

nolitafairytales: Castle Howard Interior (by DrRob)

Brideshead
contra mundum


nolitafairytales:



Castle Howard Interior (by DrRob)





@темы: brideshead, films, i am not i

Brideashead revisited

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